SOURCE SuperFoods Trehalose  454g
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SOURCE SuperFoods Trehalose 454g
$12.95

    SOURCE SuperFoods Treha Trehalose is a white crystalline powder (trehalose dehydrate) produced from cornstarch by a patented enzymatic Hayashibara process. Trehalose is a naturally-occurring sugar energy source with forty-five percent (45%) of the sweetness of refined table sugar. So, one may need to use about twice as much as normally used to get the same sweetness. It is one of the good sugars.

    There are no side effects of taking Trehalose. A clinical study performed in the UK showed that ninety-eight percent (98%) of the population had no problems or side effects using trehalose.

    Why use SOURCE SuperFoods Trehalose?*

    What makes Trehalose so special is that it acts like a sugar but it’s not really a sugar like table sugar, which is a Monosaccharide. Trehalose is a Disaccharide, with two glucose units. Trehalose releases two molecules of glucose, which can help with extended energy requirements of endurance athletes. This is double the efficiency of normal Glucose.

    Trehalose is thought to have the ability to protect the cells from dehydration by transforming into a gel phase as cells dehydrate, which prevents disruption of internal cell organelles, by effectively splinting them in position. Rehydration then allows normal cellular activity to be resumed without the major damage that would normally follow a dehydration/rehydration cycle.

    Because Trehalose protects the cells from extreme temperature changes by hydrating the cells it acts as an age reverser or beauty enhancer and is used orally as well as topically for such purposes. There is no question that Trehalose protects the cells from stress. Trehalose also has the added advantage of being an antioxidant.

    Research reveals Trehalose may help diabetics since trehalose has only 45% sweetness of sugar, many people double up portions of trehalose when using it in cooking or beverages because it does not have the harmful side effects that sugar has. Trehalose is considered a prime way to sweeten foods, without triggering the blood sugar levels and it also enhances the flavor of food.

    Although studies do not endorse trehalose directly in connection with diabetes, they do acknowledge that it reduces insulin resistance and that the blood sugar levels are substantially lower than with sugar or artificial sweeteners.

    Trehalose may improve neurological disorders. Although research is not conclusive in this area, there are many indicators that trehalose is very effective in helping individuals who suffer with nervous system disorders. Improvements such as better muscle control have been documented with conditions such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s and other neurological disorders.

    These studies are not absolute because researchers are unsure of the mechanisms that make trehalose beneficial in helping these disorders. Since trehalose is simply a food, there is no documented research that suggests using trehalose to manage any ailment, but studies do not deny noticeable improvements. There have been several studies which have also demonstrated trehalose's anti-inflammatory effects.

    How does it work?*

    This disaccharide is enzymatically hydrolyzed by the enzyme trehalase in the small intestine into two glucose subunits which are subsequently absorbed and metabolized in a manner similar to maltose. Common disaccharides such as sucrose and lactose are digested through the same physiological process. The sugar provides approximately 4 kcal of food energy per gram as do other digestible sugars and starches. The enzyme trehalase is found in human intestinal system and kidneys although its activity varies and it may be missing in some people. Studies have shown that when subjects are provided with Trehalose mixed in a 5 to 10 % solution, significant benefits were nonetheless realized via upgrading autophagy and mitigating insulin resistance. It is widely believed that 20 gms of Trehalose 2 to 3 times per day is a safe amount for human consumption.

    Suggested Use - How to take SOURCE SuperFoods Trehalose?*

    Take 1 to 2 scoops (10 to 20 grams) mixed in water, juice or other beverage, 2 to 3 times daily. May be taken with or without food.

    Continued use is necessary to maintain the benefits the benefits of SOURCE SuperFoods Trehalose.

    Caution: Insulin-dependent diabetics and pregnant women should consult their physician before use.

    FDA Statement

    *These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

    †Manufactured from corn grown in the USA, which has been certified Identity-Preserved (IP) and has NOT been genetically modified by bioengineering technology. In order to ensure that it is IP and GMO-Free, purchasing is done through contracts with farmers to buy corn which has not been genetically modified by bioengineering technology. Each lot is accompanied by proper IP documentation (signed certificate of handling that the Corn was IP at all times, and a signed certificate of origin listing location, producer, and seed corn brand). The corn is further tested by the ELISA (Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) procedure to screen for bioengineered genetic modifications if any, and PCR (polymerase chain reaction) test method, by independent laboratories to ensure integrity of the production run. This is a quality product with great intrinsic value for athletes.

    References

    Adams, R.P., Kendall, E., Kartha, K.K., 1990. Comparison of free sugars in growing and desiccated plants of Selaginella lepidophylla. Biochemical Systematics and Ecology 18, 107–110.

    Adler, M., Lee, G., 1999. Stability and surface activity of lactate dehydrogenase in spray-dried trehalose. Journal of Pharmaceutical Science 88, 199–208.

    Allison, S.D., Chang, B., Randolph, T.W., Carpenter, J.F., 1999. Birch, G.G., 1972. Mushroom sugar. In: Birch, G.G., Green, L.F., Plaskett, I.G. (Eds.), Health and Food. Elsevier Science, New York, pp. 49–53.

    Birch, G.G., 1963. Trehalose. In: Wolfrom, M.L., Tyson, R.S. (Eds.), Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry, vol. 18. Academic Press, New York, pp. 201–225.

    Blakeley, D., Tolliday, B., Colac¸o, C.A.L.S., Roser, B., 1990. Dry instant blood typing plate for bedside use. Lancet 336, 854–855.

    Bolte, J.P., Scho¨nhage, F., Fo¨rster, E., Knolle, J., Meyer zum Bu¨schenfelde, K.H., 1973. Zur diagnostischen bedeutung der trehalose-belastung bei malassimilationssyndromen. Deutsche Medizinische Wochenschrift 98, 1358–1362.

    Cabib, E., Leloir, L.F., 1957. The biosynthesis of trehalose phosphate. Journal of the American Chemical Society 75, 259–275.

    Caspary, F., 1975. Winckler, K, Lankisch, P. G., Creutzfeldt, W. Influence of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function on intestinal brush border enzymatic activities. Gut 16, 89–92.

    Cerda, J.J., Preiser, H., Crane, R.K., 1972. Brush border enzymes and malabsorption: elevated disaccharides in chronic pancreatic insufficiency with diabetes mellitus. Gastroenterology 62, 841.

    Clegg, J.S., 1965. The origin of trehalose and its significance during the formation of encysted dormant embryos of Artemia salina. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology 14, 135–143.

    Clegg, J.S., Evans, D.R., 1961. Denneberg, T., Lindberg, T., Berg, N.O., Dahlqvist, A., 1974. Morphololgy, dipeptidases and disaccharidases of small intestinal mucosa in chronic renal failure. Acta Medica Scandinavica 195, 465–470.

    Donnamaria, M.C., Howard, E.I., Grigera, J.R., 1994. Interaction of water with a,a-trehalose in solution: molecular dynamics simulation approach. Journal of the Chemical Society Faraday Transactions 90, 2731–2735.

    Dunphy, J.V., Littman, A., Hammond, J.B., Forstner, G., Dahlqvist, A., Crane, R.K., 1965. Intestinal lactase deficit in adults. Gastroenterology 49, 12–21.

    Eaton S.B., Shostak M., Konner M. (1988) The Stone Age diet. In: The Paleolithic Prescription. Harper & Row, New York, pp. 69–87. (Chapter 4).

    Elbein, A.D., 1974. The metabolism of a,a-trehalose. In: Tipson, R.S., Horton, D. (Eds.), Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry, vol. 30. Academic Press, New York, pp. 227–256.

    Elbein, A.D., Mitchell, M., 1973. Levels of glycogen and trehalose in Mycobacterium smegmatis and the purification and properties of the glycogen synthetase. Journal of Bacteriology 113, 863–873.

    Elias, E., Gibson, G.J., Greenwood, L.F., Hunt, J.N., Tripp, J.H., 1968. The slowing of gastric emptying by monosaccharides and disaccharides in test meals. Journal of Physiology 194, 317–326.

    Gudmand-Høyer, E., Fenger, H.J., Skovbjerg, H., Kern-Hansen, P., Madsen, P.R., 1988. Trehalase deficiency in Greenland. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology 23, 775–778.

    Guo, N., Puhlev, I., Brown, D.R., Mansbridge, J., Levine, F., 2000. Trehalose expression confers desiccation tolerance on human cells. Nature Biotechnology 18, 168–171.

    Harding, T.S., 1923. History of trehalose, its discovery and methods of preparation. Sugar 25, 476–478.

    Hertzler, S.R., Savaiano, D.A., 1996. Colonic adaptation to daily lactose feeding in lactose maldigesters reduces lactose intolerance. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 64, 232–236.

    Hey, A.E., Elbein, A.D., 1968. Partial purification of a trehalose from Streptomyces hygroscopicus. Journal of Bacteriology 96, 105–110.

    Hill, E.P., Sussman, A.S., 1963. Purification properties of trehalase(s) from Neurospora. Archives of Biochemistry 102, 389–396.

    Hincha, D.K., Crowe, J.H., 1998. Trehalose increases freeze-thaw damage in liposomes containing chloroplast glycolipids. Cryobiology 36, 245–249.

    Hirata, T., Yokomise, H., Fukuse, T., Muro, K., Inui, K., Hirai, T., Yagi, K., Hitomi, S., Wada, H., 1993. Effects of trehalose in preservation of canine lung for transplantation. Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 41, 59–63.

    Mouradian, R., Womersley, C., Crowe, L.M., Crowe, J.H., 1985. Degradation of functional integrity during long term storage of a freeze-dried biological membrane. Cryobiology 22, 119–124.

    Murao, S., Nagano, H., Ogura, S., Nishino, T., 1985. Enzymatic synthesis of trehalose from maltose. Agricultural and Biological Chemistry 49, 2113–2118.

    Murray, I.A., Coupland, K., Smith, J.A., Ansell, I.D., Long, R.G., 2000. Intestinal trehalase activity in a UK population: establishing a normal range and the effect of disease. British Journal of Nutrition 83, 241–245.

    Nakada, T., Maruta, K., Mitzuzumi, H., Kubota, M., Chaen, H., Sugimoto, T., Kurimoto, M., Tsujisaka, Y., 1995b. Purification and characterization of a novel enzyme, maltooligosyl trehalose trehalohydrolase, from Arthrobacter sp. Q36. Biosciences, Biotechnology and Biochemistry 59, 2215–2218.

    Nakada, T., Maruta, K., Mitzuzumi, H., Tsukaki, K., Kubota, M., Chaen, H., Sugimoto, T., Kurimoto, M., Tsujisaka, Y., 1995a. Purification and properties of a novel enzyme, maltooligosyl trehalose synthase, from Arthrobacter sp. Q36. Biosciences, Biotechnology and Biochemistry 59, 2210–2214.

    Newman, Y.M., Ring, S.G., Colaco, C., 1993. The role of trehalose and other carbohydrates in biopreservation. Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering Reviews 11, 263–294.

    Oku, T., Okazaki, M., 1998. Transitory laxative threshold of trehalose and lactulose in healthy women. Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology 44, 787–798.

    Paiva, C.L., Panek, A.D., 1996. Biotechnological applications of the disaccharide trehalose. Biotechnology Annual Reviews 2, 293–314.

    Portmann, M.O., Birch, G.G., 1995. Sweet taste and solution properties of a,a-trehalose. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 69, 275–281.

    Ravich, W.J., Bayless, T.M., 1983. Carbohydrate absorption and malabsorption. Clinical Gastroenterology 12, 335–356.

    Robison, R., Morgan, W.T.J., 1928. CLIX. Trehalosemonophosphoric ester isolated from the products of fermentation of sugars with dried yeast. Biochemical Journal 22, 1277–1288.

    Womersley, C., Smith, L., 1981. Anhydrobiosis in nematodes. I. The role of glycerol, myo-inositol and trehalose during dessication. Comparative Biochemical Physiology 70B, 579–586.

    Wyatt, G.R., Kalf, G.F., 1957. The chemistry of insect hemolymph. II. Trehalose and other carbohydrates. Journal of General Physiology 40, 833–847.

    Yokomise, H., Inui, K., Wada, H., Ueda, M., Hitomi, S., 1996. Longterm cryopreservation can prevent rejection of canine tracheal allografts with preservation of graft viability. Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgergy 111, 930–934.

    Yokomise, H., Inui, K., Wada, H., Hasegawa, S., Ohno, N., Hitomi, S., 1995. Reliable cryopreservation of trachea for one month in a new trehalose solution. Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 110, 382–385.

    Yoshida, K., Mizukawa, H., Haruki, E., 1993. Serum trehalase activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Clinica Chimica Acta 215, 123–124.

    FAQ's

    What is Trehalose?

    Trehalose is a disaccharide molecule composed of two smaller glucose molecules linked together. It is naturally produced by the body and can also be found in very small amounts in common foods such as mushrooms, honey, lobster, and foods produced using bakers and brewer’s yeast.

    What’s the source?

    Its trade name is TREHA®, and is manufactured by NAGASE, a Japanese company. It is made from GMO Free (Identity Protected), Corn. Its Kosher, and FDA GRAS Affirmed.

    How does it look and how does it taste?

    Trehalose looks and pours like regular table sugar, it is about 50% less sweeter than sugar, but it leaves no after-taste; it is NOT a chemical sugar substitute; and it can be easily used as a substitute in many recipes and dissolves easily in water and cold fluids.

    Why use SOURCE SuperFoods Trehalose?

    What makes Trehalose so special is that it acts like a sugar but it’s not really a sugar like table sugar, which is a Monosaccharide. Trehalose is a Disaccharide, with two glucose units. Trehalose releases two molecules of glucose, which can help with extended energy requirements of endurance athletes. This is double the efficiency of normal Glucose.

    How does it help an athlete?

    It has the ability to protect cells from dehydration, and it can protect the cells from extreme temperature. Which is very important for athletes who train and race in extreme conditions.

    How does it prevent dehydration?

    Trehalose is thought to have the ability to protect the cells from dehydration by transforming into a gel phase as cells dehydrate. Rehydration then allows normal cellular activity to be resumed without the major damage that would normally follow a dehydration/rehydration cycle.

    Does it provide energy and is it good for endurance?

    Yes, as a carbohydrate it provides 4 calories of efficient energy per gram, which is very important for endurance. Furthermore, it is digested and absorbed in the small intestine releasing slow and sustained energy which is very helpful during endurance events.

    Are there any other benefits of consuming Trehalose?

    Yes, Trehalose enhances cellular communication, it improves brain function and enhances memory and protects cells from stress and functions as an antioxidant. It also regulates Insulin and Glucose Levels and helps in weight management.

    Does it help in age-reversal?

    Yes it can, because Trehalose protects the cells from extreme temperature changes by hydrating the cells, and therefore it acts as an age reverser or beauty enhancer and is used orally as well as topically for such purposes. There is no question that Trehalose protects the cells from stress.

    Are there any side effects?

    There are no side effects of taking Trehalose. A clinical study performed in the UK showed that ninety-eight percent (98%) of the population had no problems or side effects using trehalose.

    Can diabetics use Trehalose?

    Research Reveals Trehalose may help diabetics since trehalose has only 45% sweetness of sugar, many people double up portions of trehalose when using it in cooking or beverages because it does not have the harmful side effects that sugar has. Trehalose is considered a prime way to sweeten foods, without triggering the blood sugar levels and it also enhances the flavor of food.

    I have heard that Trehalose can help people with neurological disorders, can you tell me about it?

    Although research is not conclusive in this area, there are many indicators that trehalose is very effective in helping individuals who suffer with nervous system disorders. Improvements such as better muscle control have been documented with conditions such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s and other neurological disorders. Also, there have been several studies which have also demonstrated Trehalose's anti-inflammatory effects.

    How Does Trehalose work?

    This disaccharide is enzymatically hydrolysed by the enzyme trehalase in the small intestine into two glucose subunits which are subsequently absorbed and metabolized. Common disaccharides such as sucrose and lactose are digested through the same physiological process. It provides approximately 4 kcal of food energy per gram as do other digestible sugars and starches.

    How to take SOURCE SuperFoods Trehalose?

    Take 2 to 4 scoops (10 to 20 grams) mixed in water, juice or other beverage, 2 to 3 times daily. May be taken with or without food. Continued use is necessary to maintain the benefits of SOURCE SuperFoods Trehalose.

    Are there any safety concerns?

    Insulin-dependent diabetics and pregnant women should consult their physician before use.

This product was added to our catalog on Thursday 09 February, 2017.